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20121202
20121210
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)
to go until all of us are hit with tax increases, takes it across the board a cut of $55 billion. people have it in their power to avoid the so-called fiscal cliff aren't negotiating, they're not debating right now, so many of them simply leaving town. but there's more going on than meets the eye. let's bring in our senior congressional correspondent dana basch, she has the latest. >> reporter: there's so much political theater around here right now, you could say tickets. one of today's acts was the house leaving. lawmakers streaming out of the capitol hill, racing to their cars to get to the airport and go home. it's a scene you usually see on a thursday afternoon or friday morning, not wednesday at noon. >> good morning. >> house republican leaders told members they're free to leave, because they have nothing to vote on. >> i understand that you are saying legislation has been put on the floor. when it comes to just pure optics of the house leaving with the fiscal cliff right in front of us -- >> i'll be here and i'll be available at any moment to sit down with the president to get se
'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." we begin with the looming tax hikes. all of us are facing a little over three weeks. those increases coupled with spending cuts in vital programs including defense, health care and housing assistance are being called the fiscal cliff. the only way to i void it is for president obama and congress to make a deal, cutting spending and raising revenue. adding to the sense of urgency. news that 350,000 people simply gave up looking for work in the month of november. and while that drove the unemployment rate down to 7.7%, the fiscal cuts and tax hikes are expected to dramatically slow job creation and increase unemployment possibly plunging the economy back into a recession. let's go to dana joining us from capitol hill. the latest negotiations don't seem to be going anywhere. >> they sure don't. the house speaker ended the week by calling it a wasted week. he only had one phone call with the president of the united states and he said it was just, "more of the same." now counter offer to what the republicans put out during the week which was $800
't enough time left to do a comprehensive deal, including tax reform, fixing medicare. so he wants congress to raise tax rates for the wealthy right now and putting off the hard work to next year. they have 28 days left to make a deal before the country hits what's called the fiscal cliff. that's a combination of across the board tax increases for everyone, coupled with cuts in spending like defense, education, health care, and housing assistance. let's go live to our chief white house correspondent jessica yellin with the very latest. jessica? >> reporter: president obama has now personally turned down speaker boehner's opening offer to avert the fiscal cliff. he did it in a tv interview. what does president obama think of speaker boehner's proposal to avert the fiscal cliff? >> unfortunately, the speaker's proposal right now is still out of balance. he talks about $800 billion worth of revenues but says he's going to do that by lowering rates. when you look at the math, it doesn't work. >> reporter: he won't agree to eliminate a tax deduction for contributions to charity. >> every hospita
blitzer. you're in "the situation room." >>> we begin with president obama taking his battle to extend tax cuts for the middle class into the heart of the middle class suburb today. he visited a family just outside washington, d.c., using their story to dramatize what will happen in just 26 days if he and congress can't make a deal on the so-called fiscal cliff. a source of great concern for so many people, everyone's taxes will go up, will go up if there's no deal. let's go live to our white house correspondent dan lothian. he's on the scene for us over at the white house. how did it go, dan? >> reporter: well, wolf, we've seen the president do this before in the past whenever he's locked in negotiations with lawmakers. he heads out on the road, either goes to a backyard or sits down around a dinner table to put pressure on congress. that's what he did today when he went to falls church sitting down with the santana family. their parents who also are employed live in the household with them. so if taxes do go up on middle class americans, the overall hit on that household will be $4,000.
cliff. the across-the-board spending cuts and sharp tax increases that hit in just 29 days. let's get straight to our senior congressional correspondent dana bash. she's watching what's going on. dana, the tax rates, first of all, let's get to a major sticking point right now. there's been a counterproposal from house republicans to the white house. you have details. >> reporter: that's right. let's start exactly where you just began on those tax rates because that has become the big divide between the two sides. the answer is the house republicans are not budging. they still want to continue the bush era tax rates at all income levels. let's get specific. first of all, the counterproposal, they say they would get about $800 billion in savings from what they call tax reform, from deductions and closing loopholes, things like that. but the bush era tax rates, all of them would remain, even for the wealthiest. to show you the difference, compared to the white house offer that they got last week, $1.6 trillion in savings when it comes to tax revenue. but much of that came from raising ta
that in federal estate taxes on her inheritance. she would not have had to pay that money if federal law had given that same sex relationship the same status as opposite sex marriages get. so it's pretty clean, a clean cut case. even the obama administration has already said it doesn't think the constitutionality, defense of marriage act, can withhold a legal attack like this, wolf. >> we expect arguments to be made when and decision to be made? >> i would estimate sometime around march of next year for the arguments. probably sometime around june of next year for a decision by the court, wolf. >> all right, thanks very much. joe johns reporting for us. bring in our senior legal analyst, jeffrey toobin and analyst gloria borger. jeff, first to you, once the supreme court makes that final decision in the spring, maybe by june at the end of the term, we will know whether or not same sex marriage will be legal, not only in those states like new york state or maryland or iowa where it is legal, but throughout the united states. >> it is a possibility, there are limited possibilities. the court specifi
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)

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